Archive for myths

Pandora’s box…

Posted in Esoteric with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 8, 2012 by Mj Rains

everyone’s got secrets…

What’s in yours?

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An apple a day…

Posted in Esoteric with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 26, 2012 by Mj Rains

appleIt is ultimately strange to me how Eve’s fruit, which is a symbol of life, a beautiful red apple, has the biblical connotation of death…death through knowledge, and banishment from paradise upon consumption. The fruit of knowledge is the Goddess’s sacred heart of immortal life and was known as the apples of immortality. The Celts called the western paradise Avalon, or “Apple-land,” a country ruled by Morgan, the queen of the dead. Kings received the magic apples of Avalon and went to live in immortality under the sunset of Morgan’s land, King Arthur among them.

Greeks have a historic tradition about Mother Hera who kept a magic garden in the west where the Tree of Life was guarded by her sacred serpent. The whole story of Eve, Adam, and the serpent in the tree was purposely changed from icons showing the Great Goddess offering life to her worshipper, in the form of an apple, with the tree and the serpent in the background.

Eve

Romans gave the apple mother the name of Pomona. She symbolized all fruition. A Roman banquet = ab ova usque mala, from eggs to apples – the beginning or the symbol of creation and ending with the symbol of completion. It was recorded that King Herod finished every meal in the Roman style, with an apple.

apple

Click images for artist links.

Source: Women’s Book of Myths and Secrets

Vintage Photo of the Week

Posted in Photography with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 8, 2012 by Mj Rains

Lauren Bacall, 1945

“Forgetfulness”

Posted in Esoteric with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 9, 2012 by Mj Rains

“Forgetfulness,” in the Greek underworld, or the Water of Oblivion, is a spring rising to the River Lethe.  According to mystery cultists, the spring of Lethe can be found under the a white cypress tree and is the first place a newly dead soul visits.  The soul, thirsty from the voyage would be tempted to indulge in the waters of forgetfulness. The ever vigilant soul, should train to learn an endurance to thirst and thus receive enlightenment. The enlightened soul would thus instead seek the spring of Memory called Mnemosyne.

“Thou shalt find to the left of the house of Hades a spring, and by the side thereof standing a white cypress. To this spring approach not near. But thou shalt find another, from the lade of Memory cold water flowing forth, and there are guardians before it.”

In classical and Gnostic texts, the exact location of Lethe is a mystery…but one is to made to believe that after preparing to enter the dark pit, one will learn his fate through “things seen” or “things heard.” Thus he has to drink of the waters of Lethe, in order to achieve forgetfulness of all previous life memories so as to achieve a new life in the underworld.

Classical writers claim Lethe as of the five major rives of the underworld, including Acheron, Cocytus, Phlegethon, and Styx.

Source: Book of Myths and Secrets

Totemic Form – woman or crow

Posted in Esoteric with tags , , , , , , , , on October 22, 2011 by Mj Rains

The vulture, raven, and carrion-eating crow were the Death-goddess symbols of ancient Europe. Valkyries, described as man-eating women, often took the totemic form as ravens or crows.

In Anglo-Danish myths a witch named Krake (Crow) was the daughter of the Valkyrie Brunnhilde.  Krake was a shape-shifter and could transform herself into a beautiful virgin or a hag or a monster or a crow.

The Three Ravens (Kraken) in old ballads were birds of doom perching over a slain hero. Sometimes there were two, as in the Ballad of Two Crows who supposedly plucked out the eyes of a dead knight.

Dreaming of crows can symbolize a sudden change in life, or perhaps death.

Native American Spirituality gives the crow this measure:

As a child I remember my Aunt telling me this poem for the omens associated with the number of crows seen at a time.
One is for bad news, Two is for mirth.
Three is a wedding, Four is a birth.
Five is for riches, Six is a thief.
Seven is a journey, Eight is for grief.
Nine is a secret, Ten is for sorrow.
Eleven is for love, Twelve for joy tomorrow.

A single crow is interpreted by some as the foretelling of ill health.

images:
Ravens Flight by jayderosalie
The Three Ravens by Melan
Read more: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_symbolic_signinficence_of_crows#ixzz1bLLAYIBp
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